Posts Tagged ‘Cheltenham’

Spectacle of Light at Sudeley Castle near Cheltenham includes light art sculptures throughout the gardens, all round the castle and historic chapel. Selected nights to 30 December.

There are people in Devon and beyond who still think I was roistering drunk that night in the king’s pavilion.

I giggled and staggered, and flirted with men in fierce armour who were set on laying waste all around them in battle the next day. It was 20–something years ago: a Live Action Roleplay weekend; and I was entirely sober but spying for anyone who’d “pay” me.

In fact I was one of those annoying players who stayed in character all weekend, even in the toilet queue at horrible o’clock when everyone else was crawling out of their hangovers. If you’ve met me, this won’t be a surprise.

Flying and handling dragons

The full length, heavy leather cloak I had made all those years ago – after too near a brush with hypothermia one soggy Sunday – now serves as the techno magical DragonProof Cloak for my storytelling persona of Agent Green the planet’s only (living) Dragon Whisperer.

It also splendidly does its original job of keeping out the weather. Add an Indiana Jones-ish hat over a bright headscarf – roll over hijab, I need warm ears! – plus big gloves and hey presto! It’s obviously a dragon wrangler’s perfect kit for flying and handling her toasty charges.

Grandmother of Dragons

When guests emerge starry-eyed from the first three quarters of the trail around this year’s Spectacle of Light at Sudeley Castle, they’re quite ready to encounter a fantasy character.

On opening night yesterday, even groups of adults without children were enchanted by the deep bass roars, the glow and smoke issuing from the Dragon Dungeon. And by the Dragon Whisperer’s spiel about a rescue dragon inhabiting the cellars.

Beware of the Dragon says the sign. I’m not quite sure who my boss means, by the way, as he’s taken to calling me Grandmother of Dragons.

Romantic, magical Spectacle of Light

December notwithstanding, the Spectacle of Light is wonderfully free of festive clichés. Not a plastic Santa in sight. From the long vista across glowing reflections in water to the venerable castle itself, to shimmering patterns unrolling from a perfect little tree, this is art made of light. As magical as the shining energy tree of Avatar. As complex as Miss Haversham. As mischievous as Alice’s mirror world. And packed with extra emotional wallop from luscious music; a different mood for each ‘set’. It’s a glorious treat for children as well as the most romantic thing I’ve seen in decades. And if you’ve been feeling low these winter nights, I’d say Spectacle of Light will lift you.

Spectacle of Light runs on selected evenings with timed entries 5pm–7.30pm
Friday 8 – Sunday 10 December
Friday 15 – Saturday 23 December
Wednesday 27 – Saturday 30 December
Please note Dragon Whisperer is on missions elsewhere 18 and 30 December 

“Tickets For Tonight” are available only in person on the day after 4pm at Sudeley Castle Visitor Centre on site

Save 10% Book in advance here

SudelyHolly2

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Cheltenham Poetry Festival logoIt was a delight, dare I say even moving, to hear the poetry choices of Cheltenham’s election candidates last night at Cheltenham Poetry Festivals world first Poetry Election.

The town’s current MP is Martin Horwood, a Liberal Democrat. He won the Poetry Election with a pair of poems that included Shelley’s Ozymandias (‘Two vast and trunkless legs of stone…’) which stopped being a cliché when Martin explained the poem’s original, harshly political context: the Peterloo massacre, repressive Corn Laws and vicious poverty.

The event in the echo-ey vastness of Frances Close Chapel on University of Gloucestershire campus was very sensibly free, so nearly 100 people including the be-chained Mayor of Cheltenham and plenty of arty types packed the front pews to hear readings and a short debate. For an informal arts event in Gloucestershire, that’s an almost miraculously good house.
Other things were revealed. Only the Green candidate Adam Van Coevorden knew how to use a microphone. Labour candidate Paul Gilbert had thought about how the arts enhance education. UKIP newbie Christina Simmons didn’t seem to have an arts policy at all and put austerity far ahead of support for the arts. Martin Horwood vaunted the array of Cheltenham Festivals, quite reasonably on the basis of his involvement in helping to win funding for them. Everybody on the platform got stuck in to their poems with gusto, even indie candidate Richard Lupson-Darnell who confessed to loathing poetry at school.
Call it creativity…
But none of the candidates showed any real understanding of the arts world. Cheltenham’s wonderful Playhouse Theatre – that welcomes professional, semi pro and amateur performance in a way that some of the town’s posh publicly funded venues dismally fail to do – never got a mention.
Beyond the official Festivals, and a yearning for the long lost Axiom centre, the candidates clearly had no concept of working in the arts. If you call it creativity, by the way, the elitist overtone goes away.
Nobody spoke about how creativity – received or participated in – supports mental health, potentially saving the NHS fortunes as depression attains epidemic proportions in the UK. Nobody spoke about how millions of creative people in the UK today – dedicated, intelligent people who train to a high standard and who commit their finances, heart and soul to their work – are unable to make a living.
The thing that makes your heart sing
Nobody spoke about how ‘working in the arts’ carries such a stigma now that it’s almost better to be outed as a banker.
Nobody spoke about how most creative people must, for the whole of their adult lives, consign their talent to a mere hobby to be fitted around zero hours contracts, inadequate wages and exhaustion. If you have any spark of creativity in the UK today, but you’re outside the elite cliques of arts stars and large scale commercialism (film, musical theatre, video games) then all you can expect is sneering discouragement.
Your ability, the thing that makes your heart sing and gives you a reason for living – will be dismissed with a cry of “Get a proper job!”
Cultural desert
After 15 years working full time as a spoken word performer, and observing a wide range of theatre and music from the inside, I’ve concluded that Gloucestershire is a cultural desert where nobody wants to go to anything except the pub, and if they drag themselves to a show they certainly don’t want to pay more than the price of a pint.
Oh, all right, there’s a thin cadre of intellectuals who rather joylessly patronise opera, literature, smart exhibitions and the snob end of culture. Often nowhere near Gloucestershire, let alone Cheltenham or oh my goodness rough old Gloucester.
I could be wrong. It could be that 15 years battling the dead weight of indifference has skewed my view.
Last night’s Poetry Election showed that even politicians can be moved by – and can reach other people through – a thoughtful choice of poem.
But the cold truth in Cheltenham as in most of Britain is that the general public has no interest in what creative people can do. They don’t know, don’t care, don’t go. I’m good at only one thing: telling stories. I have to face every day knowing that very nearly nobody wants what I do best.
Story Cabaret entertainer, spoken word artist Chloë of the Midnight Storytellers

Chloë: new contemporary Story Cabaret

Notes

•  The Jordans Cheltenham Poetry Festival runs 20 April – 3 May 2015: from the world’s gloomiest poet (who will have you in stitches) to duck infested canal poetry, plus bands, hip hop and poetry for children.

•  Scheherazade’s Shed – the world première of my new contemporary story show for adults is Monday 27 April 9pm at Cheltenham Playhouse, ticket £7 or concession price £4. Please pre book from the Playhouse 01242 522 852

Cheltenham’s parliamentary candidates, in alphabetical order, are: